THE RED GAMBIT SERIES

Author Colin Gee

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congouy
Member
Posts: 1

I'm a great fan of your books but I feel that  the soviets are always too clever and the alies too dumb.

Don't forget that in the real war the americans produced half of the war material, two thirds of the floating tonnage and half of the industrial production of the world. They also fought a two front war and won it.

Please don't take too much time to publish the next book.

Cheers

January 27, 2014 at 9:52 AM Flag Quote & Reply

gee_colin@yahoo.co.uk
Site Owner
Posts: 916

Hi, and thanks for the comments. Not sure I agree with commentgs that generalise quite that much. I'm in the middle of doing a list of all battles and end results thus far, and it makes interesting reading. However, just for now, i would say that, to name but a few, the Allies at Hamburg, Heilengenthal, Malkendorf, Brahmsee, Barnstorf and Stuttgart were not in the dumb category, whilst the Red Army forces at Malkendorf, Brahmsee, the Argen River, and Kefermarkt were not the sharpest of troops. I've restricted that list, as I dont know how far you have read. As in all walks of life, there are dumb and bright folk on all sides and, I hope, you will find blundering Englishmen beside incompetent Americans, next to useless Germans, all opposed by Soviet idiots. If you can't find enough of any one group, I'm sure there will be more along directly :-) Thanks for commenting.

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January 28, 2014 at 5:31 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Bennie McRae
Member
Posts: 18

I love these books also. I see the Russians being more clever because they are the aggressors and thus had time to plan and put people and plans into place and the Americans as "dumb" because they thought the war in Europe was over and they were caught with their pants down and have to play catch up. My only small "quibble" is when it comes to mortar and artillery rounds, it seems like everytime a round lands something gets hit like a tank or a manned position. Sure that happens in war, but sometimes artillery will not hit anything directly and have no effect. In Desert Storm we hammered the Iraqi positions with MLRS rockets before we conducted our ground assault and once our tanks rolled onto the Iraqi positions it was as if nothing had been done to them. No trenches were collapsed, no bunkers hit and I only saw impact bomb crater that was like 50 meters in front of an Iraqi trench that still had live Iraqis in it.


February 24, 2015 at 9:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

gee_colin@yahoo.co.uk
Site Owner
Posts: 916

Not sure I would go along with the perception... but perceptions are very individual things :-) I think it is generally accepted that 80% of Allied casualties in Normandy were caused by mortars, which lends itself to thinking that they were effective beasts... in that terrain. Im certainly aware that artillery can miss, and miss it does. It also hits, and hot it does too, although the hits will probably get more of a mention, such as at Ahlen, where a hit has extended consequences. mIt is also fair that it depends on what ammo was being used. A single HE shell may well miss, a frag shell is more likely to take out a soldier in its radius, even if it misses etc. I think I would find it difficult to suggest that I could write more about the misses. I think I sort of hope that readersunderstand that I will write about the specific effects of a hit, and generally refer to misses. I use terms like 'pattering of shrapnel on a tank'. Speaking a while back to a German veteran of Normandy, he, when in proper positions, felt relatively safe from everything except the bigger artillery and the naval guns. he spoke of a heavy bomber strike on his positions which virtually wiped out his company in five minutes, but he also conceded that, when on the Russian front, a Katyusha strike killed and wounded about 90% of another two company unit that was drawing itself up ready for a counter-attack. As in all things, I suspect we can find examples of useless barrages and incredibly superb artillery and mortar work. I would love to use MLRS in these books. Always thought they were dastardly bits of kit, but no way could I get them in and maintain credibility  :-)

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February 25, 2015 at 6:05 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Bennie McRae
Member
Posts: 18

I see where you are coming from and totally understand. World War II or in this instance World War III was far  more brutal than Desert Storm and both sides employed more artillery guns. I do love how you are very descriptive when a round lands nearby a group of soldiers. (Minor SPOILER) reading "Sacrifice" now and thought it was funny how the pencil got stuck in the neck of that sniper. Still on that part of the book so I hope he eventually gets it pulled out! MLRS would be cool, but I totally understand you can't just have one roll up and start plastering the Soviet positions. Perhaps you can have the Germans manufacture something close to it based off the Sherman Calliope and the Russian Katuysha?

February 28, 2015 at 9:48 AM Flag Quote & Reply

gee_colin@yahoo.co.uk
Site Owner
Posts: 916

The allies had multi launchers, and they will have their mention. As for the pencil in Irlam's neck...

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February 28, 2015 at 5:37 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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